Vehicles re-tested under WLTP showing ‘greater than expected’ CO2 rises

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Vehicles re-tested under the new WLTP fuel economy cycle are recording “greater than expected” CO2 emissions when figures are converted back to NEDC, JATO Dynamics has warned, resulting in possible increases in fleet taxation.

More realistic fuel economy data could result in CO2 increases of 20% compared to the outgoing test cycle

More realistic fuel economy data could result in CO2 increases of 20% compared to the outgoing test cycle

The World Harmonised Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP) came into force in September, replacing the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC) and aimed at offering more representative fuel consumption and CO2 emission data for new vehicles.

Within 12 months, all new cars will have to be re-tested to produce WLTP data, except those that are due to be discontinued. WLTP is expected to result in CO2 increases of around 20% compared to NEDC figures.

However, as taxation and the EU’s fleet-wide CO2 target of 95g/km are both based on NEDC figures, there’s a crossover period where both sets of data will be required. All new vehicles will be WLTP-tested, and converted to ‘NEDC correlated’ fuel economy and CO2 emissions using a tool called CO2MPAS.

Analysis from JATO, published in a new white paper, has shown this could be problematic. The first NEDC correlated figures on UK model cars are up to 18% higher than the genuine NEDC fuel economy and CO2 emissions from earlier this year.

And that could bring increased taxes for fleets and fleet drivers, depending on the market.

JATO also warned that this could make the 2020 95g/km CO2 targets very difficult to meet, placing greater reliance on electrification: “The automotive industry would need fully electric vehicles to account for 15% of the market in 2021 in order to meet the 95g/km CO2 target. This is striking considering that the current level of fully electric vehicles registered in the EU is 1% of the market.

“It’s clear change needs to happen, considering the combination of the current trend of declining demand for diesels and the reduced diesel offerings from automotive companies, as well as the growth of the SUV segment and the slow progress of electric vehicles in the industry.”

Data source: JATO Dynamics.

Make Model Version Oct 17 CO2 Oct 18 CO2 Increase % increase
BMW X5 3.0 XDRIVE30D A 156 183 27 17%
BMW X5 3.0 M500 A 173 205 32 18%
BMW X5 3.0 XDRIVE40D A 157 183 26 17%
BMW X6 3.0 M50D 174 206 32 18%
BMW X6 3.0 XDRIVE30D A 157 183 26 17%
BMW X6 3.0 XDRIVE40D A 163 183 20 12%
PEUGEOT 308 1.2 PURETECH 130 ALLURE SW 111 124 13 12%
PEUGEOT 308 1.2 PURETECH 130 ACTIVE SW 106 121 15 14%
PEUGEOT 308 1.2 PURETECH 130 ALLURE 107 120 13 12%
PEUGEOT 308 1.2 PURETECH 130 ACTIVE 104 117 13 13%
VOLVO XC60 2.0 D4 MOMENTUM GEARTRONIC 4WD 133 144 11 8%
VOLVO XC60 2.0 D5 INSCRIPTION GEARTRONIC 4WD 144 152 8 6%
VOLVO XC60 2.0 D4 INSCRIPTION GEARTRONIC 4WD 133 148 15 11%
VOLVO XC60 2.0 D4R DESIGN GEARTRONIC 4WD 133 148 15 11%
VOLVO XC60 2.0 D5R DESIGN GEARTRONIC 4WD 144 152 8 6%
VOLVO XC90 2.0 D5 AWD INSCRIPTION GEARTRONIC 149 163 14 9%
VOLVO XC90 2.0 D5 AWD MOMENTUM GEARTRONIC 149 173 24 16%
VOLVO XC90 2.0 D5 AWR R DESIGN GEARTRONIC 149 163 14 9%
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Alex Grant

Trained on Cardiff University’s renowned Postgraduate Diploma in Motor Magazine Journalism, Alex is an award-winning motoring journalist with ten years’ experience across B2B and consumer titles. A life-long car enthusiast with a fascination for new technology and future drivetrains, he joined Fleet World in April 2011, contributing across the magazine and website portfolio and editing the EV Fleet World Website.